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World production of silver 2011 (2010)

World production of the precious metal gray rose again in 2010. silver, unlike gold, has seen its production increase since 2003. This difference in production between the gold and silver is not a coincidence, but the geology and history of their production.

I. World production of silver.
World production of silver in 2010 was 22,200 tons, 713 million ounces of silver (one ounce is equal to 31,103 grams). Silver production increased by 1.8% since 2009, of 59.7% since its low in 1994 and 161.9% since 1968. Gold production increased by 8.7% since 1994 and 70% in 1968.
World production of silver in 2010 has naturally increased with the increase of the combined production of copper, zinc and gold. I remind you that over two thirds of the production of silver is not from primary silver mines, but mine bi products that produce zinc, copper, lead and gold. The increase in simultaneous production of production of copper, zinc, lead and gold has mechanically lead to increased production of silver in the world

II. World production of silver by country.
Peru remains in 2010, the first world producer of silver. Silver production in Peru was 123.7 million ounces in 2010, it drops by 1.3% compared to 2009. The first silver mine in Peru has produced 14.9 million ounces, is a copper mine which also produces silver (12% of silver production in Peru). The second silver mine in Peru produced 10 million ounces (8% of silver production in Peru) and the third 8.6 million ounces (7% of silver production in Peru). The first three mines produce a quarter of the country's silver, the rest is taken by more than 140 mines.
Mexico is the second largest producer of silver in 2010, production declined slightly from 114.1 to 112.5 million ounces of silver. The first silver mine in Mexico produced 35.9 million ounces of silver in 2010, one third of the country's production and 5% of world production of silver in 2010: the second mine to silver in the world. The mine also produces the silver, gold, lead and zinc.
China (No. 1 zinc, lead and gold), the third largest producer, has a silver production continues to grow in 2010, from 93.2 to 96.4 million ounces of silver. The largest silver mine in China (limited information available, so no guarantee) is also a wealth of zinc and lead and is only 4-5% of national production and 0.6% of world production.
Australia (No. 2 lead and gold) is the fourth largest producer of silver with 54.6 million ounces of silver produced in 2010. Australia has the largest silver mine in the world, c is a zinc and lead mine, which produces more silver. The first silver mine in Australia produces two thirds of the silver the country is 5.2% of world production of silver.
Chile (No. 1 copper), is the fifth largest producer of silver with 48 million ounces of silver produced in 2010. The first silver producer in the country is the world's largest producer of copper. It extracts a quarter of silver production in Chile.
Russia is the sixth largest producer of silver in the world with 45 million ounces of silver produced in 2010, one third comes from a single mine that produces gold with silver.
Bolivia is the seventh largest producer of silver with 43.7 million ounces of silver in 2010. The main silver mine in Bolivia has produced 6.7 million ounces of silver in 2010.
The USA is the eighth silver producers in the world with 41.1 million ounces of silver produced in 2010. The first U.S. silver mine which is located in Alaska is also the eighth silver mine in the world. It represents 17% of the silver from the U.S., it also produces zinc and lead.
Poland is the 9th largest producer of silver with 38.5 million ounces of silver. Polish production of 100% silver comes from one mine, a copper mine ...
Of these nine countries, the only national champion that produces only the silver in Bolivia. For all other silver producing countries, the largest silver mines produce all at once copper, zinc, lead, molybdenum or gold.

Two-thirds of silver production is not derived from primary silver mines, but mine bi-products that produce silver with copper, zinc, gold, lead, molybdenum, or even of uranium (in Australia). It is for this reason that the future of silver production depends half of the production of zinc and copper. While the price of silver is often put in parallel with that of gold, its production, it depends primarily on the production of zinc and copper. The peak production of silver will probably happen at the same time as copper and zinc. At that time, probably, the silver will catch up sharply behind the gold. Its ratio back then, at least at one of the great era of bimetallism before the gold standard and the end of bimetallism, the ratio was 15...

Dr Thomas Chaize

 

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